The Hidden World of Nutrition Labels

September 8, 2017

How many times have you purchased a product thinking this looks like a great purchase that surely fits my healthy lifestyle then  find out you were tricked yet again? Well don't worry it happens to all of us. We see a product that seems great the boxes say things like "Low Carb," "ONLY 1g NET Carb," "No added sugars." Lets be honest this list can go on and on,..I'm sure you get my point. Then you realize that the ingredients these foods actually have are not that great and the food you just bought is not really one you should be eating as part of a healthy lifestyle. Here are some tricks the food industry won't tell you, but I'm happy to share so that you can avoid being tricked next time. 

 

1. If a product says is has zero grams added sugar but it has fruit concentrate instead (of course this has to be ok cause its fruit right). Actually fruit concentrate is fruit that has been heated and reduced the all the skin and fiber is strained out leaving only a sweet liquid that is used as fruit concentrate "sugar" (can also be dried and used). 

Check out more details in this article: http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/09/01/545336956/what-is-fruit-concentrate-anyway-and-is-it-good-for-you

 

2. What about the awesome low carb dessert/granola bars by Atkins or Quest? This again is great marketing these products put low carb or 1g net carb on the front of the box. But when you flip it over and read the ingredients they list sugar alcohols in the nutrition label. This is the substitute for the sugar in these products. However, sugar alcohol will cause an increase in blood sugars (what people buying these foods are trying to avoid). The real bummer is that this sort of deceptive labeling is totally legal according to labeling guidelines. 

 

3. Zero Grams Trans Fat/serving: 

This is a biggie for those who like to each peanut butter, mayonnaise, any fried foods, etc. Lets start with reading the ingredients, anytime you see a hydrogenated oil or partially hydrogenated oil, the product has trans fat in it. What the label is truly stating is that there are less than 0.5g trans fat or less per serving of that product. If you were to eat that product you would be eating trans fat and it would be measurable after passing the serving size that is described in the nutrition label. This also falls with in the nutrition labeling guidelines.  

 

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